Emilio - A Picture Book for Children


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My young grandson of three really enjoys Emilio on my kindle and it is a very helpful way of amusing him when we need him to be patient and sit still at the restaurant table. Is there an actual doll to buy I wonder? One person found this helpful. This bright cheerful book is a great idea for children. A godsend to keep them distracted during a meal out etc. Has the appeal of being on a Kindle.

A delightful rhyming story that can be read over and over to a small child. Emilio and James are endearing characters and I hope to see other books with their adventures! See all 3 reviews.

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Emilio - A Picture Book for Children - Kindle edition by Silvina De Vita. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features. blacksmithsurgical.com: Emilio goes wild - a picture book for children eBook: Alice Jackson, Silvina De Vita: Kindle Store.

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Click here Would you like to report this content as inappropriate? Click here Do you believe that this item violates a copyright? There's a problem loading this menu right now. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. One of its strengths and perhaps also one of its weaknesses i This was an interesting book due to it is one of the only graphic books that I have come across that could be geared towards a younger audience.

One of its strengths and perhaps also one of its weaknesses is the fact that it is an informative book. This adds a realistic claim to the book although the realism is unfortunately lost when it takes into effect the parts that are definitely added just to make the story a story. In trying to keep a realistic tone the author and illustrator go above and beyond to add some gruesome moments to the story. Some parts I could have dealt with but wiping out a whole new generation and reemphasizing the removal of females from the story with just the smallest of nods as to their needed roles wasn't something that say with me.

The graphics walked a fine balance for me. They were mostly cartoonist and silly since most bears don't have such an array of expressions. The backgrounds were good, though, and other animal characters kept their cute looks or as they normally appear to us. In the end the best were the scenes that included the Northern lights. In the end it was a cute read that can help younger readers understand some of the dangers that are faced by today's polar bears although it needs to be read with a spoonful of sugar.

Otherwise actual nonfiction books on these creatures would be the better introduction and a more reliable source for polar bear information. Waluk is a polar bear cub on his own. After floundering a bit in his efforts to survive, he meets an old polar bear named Manitok. The two team up to find food and shelter in the unforgiving far north. Three of the pages of back matter discuss conservation concerns and modern threats to polar bear habitats.

This story was originally told in Spanish and published in Spain, and the Waluk is a polar bear cub on his own. This story was originally told in Spanish and published in Spain, and there are points in the story when the text feels stilted and awkward. The art, however, overcomes this weakness -- Miralles is a practiced graphic novel artist, and it shows. The bears are approachable and alive with movement, and the colors feel bright, even in the seemingly limited palette of the arctic.

The creators impressively make a sad modern story interesting and accessible — this title will be a welcome addition to many library collections. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This caught my attention because I've always liked polar bears. It has nice art and a cut story, but ultimately feels a bit strange to me. Much of it is very fact based, even including an afterword telling about the current plight of polar bears, so it feels a bit out of place having all of the bears suddenly act in a very un-bear-like way, coordinating a rescue mission unless that is based on a true event, but I think it would make that clear if it were so.

And as a story, it has a kind of we This caught my attention because I've always liked polar bears. And as a story, it has a kind of weak conclusion; it shoves in a sort of happy ending summary that says Waluk grows up to be an awesome polar bear, but we don't really see much of that growth; the most mature and remarkable thing he does in the story is organizing the other bears, but that is said to be a one-off event. Por de pronto a poner a parir a los humanos, pero siendo unos osos nada osos, y si muy humanos, incluso asamblearios y combativos… en fin..

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O para ponerse a leer en el bar gafapastoso de turno. Buen dibujo de Ana Miralles en una historia que ni va ni viene de Emilio Ruiz. Vamos que no me gustado ni para regalar a un sobrino, si es que tuviera. Oct 27, mg rated it really liked it Shelves: Waluk is the story of a young polar bear who is trying to maneuver a harsh world all alone. His mother has "abandoned" him, and he is left to find food for himself, fighting hunger for the first time in his life.

Thankfully he meets an older polar bear, and together they forage for food, uncovering companionship and a sense of security in the meantime. Things become complicated when Manitok and Waluk are separated - leaving Waluk alone once again, and having to make some very difficult decisions. Emilio Ruiz and Ana Miralles collaborated beautifully on this graphic novel.

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This story dances back and forth between the harsh realities of polar bear life and the adorableness of a naive young bear. The images and scenes are very realistic and at times gruesome and impress upon the reader the severity of life in the Arctic. It is a touching book, too, however, and ultimately leaves readers with a sense of warmth inside. Miralles does a beautiful job drawing Waluk as an adorable, cartoonish bear, contrasted by the rest of the polar bears who are very real-to-life.

I found this to be an ingenious way of drawing the reader into the harshness of the climate and the polar bears' lives, while simultaneously separating the reader from the harshness just enough to remember that the story is fictional.

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May 23, Anna Richland rated it really liked it Shelves: My daughter loves graphic novels, and I'm always looking for new ones because she zooms through several a day when she's in a reading mood. This was a hit! First, high credit for the two pages of outtake sketches at the end.

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She put a piece of plain paper over them and traced all the polar bear sketches for herself - immense satisfaction with the results. I've never seen another graphic novel with this type of sketch page, and it was a really nice addition. She was inspired enough by this book t My daughter loves graphic novels, and I'm always looking for new ones because she zooms through several a day when she's in a reading mood. She was inspired enough by this book to talk about it at dinner, and make connections - one of the panels p. She pointed out that it was a trap, because the sign on the side said "Danger Bear Trap" - but she added, "Bears can't read, so he went in.

Really beautiful artwork - complex watercolor shading - and the story is very good. Not too heavy handed on the save the Arctic - just the right balance between that issue and bear life. Apr 11, Kaethe rated it liked it Shelves: The science of global warming is spot on and the polar bear behavior and biology, and the bears are engaging. Well, there's reference to Waluk's mother, but she's never shown. Maybe I should start giving all books the Bechdel test and failing where appropriate.

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I realize that humans are the antagonists, but if the names aren't just made up there should at least be an end note telling us where they came from, and how to pronounce them. Feb 11, Cecilia Alonso rated it liked it. Waluk is a young polar bear cub who feels abandoned by his mother. He sets off on his own to find some food. Not knowing how nor being quite strong enough to hunt on his own he decides to steal bird eggs. Eventually he encounters a fellow loner who is on the other end of the lifespan.

Manitok is an old bear who is getting thin and losing his teeth so he is no longer the best hunter. Together the two explore their dwindling habitat looking for food and encountering humans at various times.

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Lists with This Book. The images and scenes are very realistic and at times gruesome and impress upon the reader the severity of life in the Arctic. Also, the book's purpose of teaching about global warming is somewhat glossed over; especially when fantasy elements suddenly appear at the very end. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. The illustrations are gorgeous!

This g Waluk is a young polar bear cub who feels abandoned by his mother. This graphic novel isn't about a cute and cuddly little polar bear - though he is cute. It is about polar bears trying to survive in a melting world where humans - both good and bad - are around every corner. The illustrations are gorgeous!

Readers will learn a great deal about these creatures as they read the well-illustrated story. Oct 01, Melissa Mcavoy rated it it was ok Shelves: I really like the illustrations of this graphic novel and don't even mind the rather predictable Disneyesque story of an old bear taking a young cub under his wing with the end result that the young cub has an opportunity to save the old bear. What is problematic is the veneer of environmental significance and the end note that gives the population for polar bears as thousand with the warning that it is estimated there will only be by I can't pretent to really know polar bear pop I really like the illustrations of this graphic novel and don't even mind the rather predictable Disneyesque story of an old bear taking a young cub under his wing with the end result that the young cub has an opportunity to save the old bear.

I can't pretent to really know polar bear populations, but there is a lot in the press that indicates estimates have been guesses, the numbers haven't dropped in 15 years and in fact have grown substantially since the 70's. No mention is made of any of this current controversy. The mix of environmental info within a highly fictionalized story of anthropomorphized bears is deeply questionable, no matter how fine the art. Oct 28, Dolores rated it liked it.

Waluk is a polar bear cub who had been abandoned by his mother. Apparently, this is the way things are done in the polar bear world. He has to learn to fend for himself, but in the changing world, food is growing increasingly scarce, and he is finding it very difficult to do. Fortunately he meets an old, wise polar bear named Manitok.

Manitok has plenty of knowledge to share with Waluk, but he is growing too old and toothless to put his knowledge to work. Together the two are able to survive, until Manitok runs into a more vicious predator-man. Has Waluk learned enough from his mentor to save him? This book shares with readers the ever growing plight of the polar bear. And, okay--everything is tied up with a pretty neat bow, but it is a pretty sweet book. I can live with that. Waluk is a young polar bear who has been left alone and has to fend for himself in the vast Arctic lands.

Waluk knows what and how he needs to hunt for food but is too afraid of doing it on his own. Add to that the changing temperature and landscape! Waluk befriends an older bear Manitok and together the pair learn to survive in the harsh conditions for a polar bear. This is a beautifully illustrated graphic novel. The harsh realities of the melting ice makes for a serious backdrop for this story Waluk is a young polar bear who has been left alone and has to fend for himself in the vast Arctic lands.

The harsh realities of the melting ice makes for a serious backdrop for this story telling. Along with the themes of survival, friendship, loyalty and coming of age, this is a good read for kids and create awareness of the seriousness of the melting ice problem. Love this one for the theme and artwork. This is a cute and quick graphic novel about a young polar bear who is forced to learn to survive on his own after being abandoned by his mother as is common with polar bears. While out searching for food, unsuccessfully, he meets the aging bear Manitok, who takes Waluk under his wing and teaches him to hunt.

When Manitok is caught in a trap, though, Waluk must use his wits to figure out how to save him. This story dealt well with the harsh realities of nature and issues related to hunting and This is a cute and quick graphic novel about a young polar bear who is forced to learn to survive on his own after being abandoned by his mother as is common with polar bears. This story dealt well with the harsh realities of nature and issues related to hunting and global warming.